IndoDaily Home Page  


. India Works With University Of Leicester On First National Astronomy Satellite

Astrosat will carry five instruments to observe exotic objects such as black holes, neutron stars, and active galaxies at a number of different wavelengths simultaneously, from the ultraviolet band to energetic x-rays.
by Staff Writers
Leicester, UK (SPX) Feb 05, 2009
India's first national Astronomy satellite - Astrosat - is to have key components assembled by the University of Leicester.

A team of engineers from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai, has arrived at the University of Leicester's Space Research Centre to progress work on the satellite which is due for launch in 2009.

The team, who will be in Leicester until Friday 6th February, will work on the next phase of the mission, when hardware manufactured in India arrives in Leicester for inspection, testing and assembly into a space qualified X-ray camera.

Guy Peters, Astrosat SXT Project Manager UK, said: "In several months, when the camera has been assembled and the Leicester built detector assembly and control electronics installed, it will be tested to space qualified standards and shipped back to India for integration into the spacecraft."

Mr Sangam Sinha from the Tata Institute added: "Astrosat is critical to the Indian space programme as it is the first satellite entirely dedicated to the pursuit of science. Astrosat also forms the beginning of a long term collaboration between TIFR and the University of Leicester through which it is hoped that many more missions will be undertaken jointly by the Indian and UK teams."

Astrosat will carry five instruments to observe exotic objects such as black holes, neutron stars, and active galaxies at a number of different wavelengths simultaneously, from the ultraviolet band to energetic x-rays.

The camera was designed by the University of Leicester and the manufacture of the hardware components was undertaken by the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

In addition to the manufacture of the camera hardware, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research has built the main telescope body and mirror. The University of Leicester is to assemble the camera, support the project through consultancy and calibrate the camera at the Space Research Centre.

The University of Leicester Space Research Centre was asked to undertake the SXT camera development because of its track record in spacecraft design, in missions such as Swift and XMM-Newton and the experience gained from its CCD laboratory programmes.

The delegation from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research currently visiting Leicester includes:

Mr. Sangam Sinha - Chief Engineer - Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

Mr. Harshit Shah - Astrosat Mechanical Engineer - Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Leicester
Astronomy News from Skynightly.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
NASA's SkyView Delivers The Multiwavelength Cosmos
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Feb 05, 2009
Some three million times a year, researchers, educators, and amateur astronomers all over the world ask NASA's SkyView virtual observatory to serve up images of some interesting corner of the cosmos. Since 1994, this digital archive has made access to and manipulation of celestial surveys its specialty. It boasts a full spectrum of data, ranging from radio to gamma-rays.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • China condemns 'despicable' British shoe protest
  • Chinese dissident to stand trial over quake campaign
  • Protester throws shoe at Chinese PM in Britain
  • Obama urged to pressure China on human rights

  • German troops to be stationed in France in post-war first
  • Commentary: Discordant wavelengths
  • China upset over shoe protest, but no harm to UK ties: govt
  • Chinese military chief vows nuclear, conventional build-up

  • Russian Military To Be Fully Rearmed By 2020
  • Russia Fully Staffs Bases In Abkhazia, South Ossetia
  • Russian Technologies On The Way To Becoming Super-Corporation
  • Outside View: RAO UES liquidation near end

  • Crop-eating caterpillars 'worse' than army worms: Liberia
  • Tracking Poultry Litter Phosphorus: Threat Of Accumulation
  • Gene-Engineered Flies Are Pest Solution
  • Climate Change Enhances Grassland Productivity

  • Covanta Energy To Build Energy-From-Waste Plant In Wales
  • Worlds Most Advanced New Steam Turbine For Combined-Cycle Power Plants
  • ADA-ES Renames Its Activated Carbon Joint Venture
  • US And China In Race To The Top Of Global Wind Industry

  • China plans own satellite navigation system by 2015: state media
  • Fengyun-3A Weather Satellite Begins Weather Monitoring
  • Shenzhou-7 Monitor Satellite Finishes Mission After 100 Days In Space
  • China Launches Third Fengyun-2 Series Weather Satellite

  • China Eastern may take three years to be profitable: chairman
  • First China-assembled Airbus set for May test flight: report
  • New Airbus joint-venture with China announced
  • New Turbines Can Cut Fuel Consumption For Business Jets

  • Tesla shifts electric sedan site to win US government loan
  • Toyota Eco-Friendly Dealerships Lead In Environmental Construction
  • Development Center For Hybrid And Electric Vehicle Battery Systems
  • California applauds Obama environmental measures

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement